Big Data News – 13 Jan 2016

Top Stories
Cisco's new Toronto Innovation Center is an impressive showcase of how to use technology to create a far more attractive and flexible workspace.

Dynatrace Load will make it possible for IT organizations to run "what-if scenarios" surrounding new applications or changes to existing one.

SQL is, arguably, the biggest workload many organizations run on their Hadoop clusters. And there's good reason why: The combination of a familiar interface (SQL) along with a modern computing architecture (Hadoop) enables people to manipulate and query data in new and powerful ways. But not all SQL-on-Hadoop tools are equal, and that makes picking the right tool a challenge.

This week at the Detroit Auto Show, Toyota announced a partnership with Kymeta to integrate advanced satellite technology into its new cars.

It would seem that enterprises of all sizes should be scrambling to boost their storage capacity, but the market is largely flat.

The presentation by Sergey Sverchkov during JAX London below focuses on real-world successful attempts to benchmark four of the most popular NoSQL databases side by side.

You might have missed one significant bit of news tucked into yesterday's Microsoft R announcement: R is coming to Visual Studio: R Tools for Visual Studio (RTVS) follows the model of Python Tools for Visual Studio: it's an open-source plug-in to Visual Studio that makes it a complete IDE for R, with syntax-aware editing, a command-line REPL, and interactive debugging. (Like PTVS, there will be a GitHub repo for RTVS when it's ready for release.) Of course, RStudio already has excellent capabilities for developing R code, and RTVS isn't available — yet. But if you already develop in Visual Studio, or want to develop R code alongside C++, JavaScript, Python or any language supported by Visual Studio, send an email to RTVS-Invite@Microsoft.com to sign up for early access to RTVS.

Analysis: How does Google's acquisitions and positioning of Google Glass point to a future in healthcare?

There are some big changes in the patent landscape hiding behind a small drop in the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office last year. The 1 percent decline in utility patent grants — the first since 2007 — follows three successive years of more than 8 percent growth, according to analysis by IFI Claims Patent Services. Grants to IT companies have driven growth in recent years but even IBM, which has topped the patent rankings for 23 years, received fewer grants last year (7,355) than in 2014 (7,534). Behind the stagnation in overall numbers are some big changes in the classes in which the USPTO is granting patents.

Guest blog post by Debleena Roy Imagine being inside a child's brain as she takes her major life decisions. Imagine the feelings of joy, sadness, fear, disgust and anger jostling with each other as she goes through the one of the biggest changes in her life, leaving her home. Imagine taking the Train of Thought over the Imagination Island and creating long-term core memories that define her growing personality traits (I mean) islands. Well, the imagination just came alive in Disney's latest movie "Inside Out". But of course, this is not meant to be a movie review. Or a recommendation.

There are some big changes in the patent landscape hiding behind a small drop in the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office last year. The 1 percent decline in utility patent grants — the first since 2007 — follows three successive years of more than 8 percent growth, according to analysis by IFI Claims Patent Services. Grants to IT companies have driven growth in recent years but even IBM, which has topped the patent rankings for 23 years, received fewer grants last year (7,355) than in 2014 (7,534). Behind the stagnation in overall numbers are some big changes in the classes in which the USPTO is granting patents.

Companies could create new, revenue-generating services from the "data streams" they produce, but it requires a data-savvy culture and new skills, according to research supported by the Society for Information Management's Advanced Practices Council.

Analysis: Information management may provide the solution to keep your analytics flowing while better managing your data.

Databricks has a new CEO, promoted from within; its old CEO is now executive chairman; and a new SVP of Worldwide Sales is hired from outside.

VB WEBINAR: We've tracked over $3.8 billion in acquisitions and IPOs for marketing tech in Q4 of 2015. The results are staggering. Join VB's analyst and VC pros to learn where the market 's heading and how you can benefit from it. Register here for free. With venture capital investments changing significantly in the last two years, the 2016 landscape is shaping up to be a completely different experience than ever before. You may have heard by now how the VC landscape underperformed in Q4 of 2015, but don't let those news reports fool you into thinking the sky is falling. The volume of deals — in both amounts and frequency — showed VC confidence in marketing tech. The ink is almost dry on our latest Q4 report — and we'll be sharing compelling insights from the close of 2015 during this upcoming webinar and what you need to be concerned with as to where VC is trending in the new year.

Google gets serious about virtual reality: That's the crystal-clear message from a VP shuffle that has Clay Bavor now focusing only on VR. His other stuff got given to Diane Greene. (Yes, Bavor is now VP of VR. Honestly, sometimes this stuff writes itself.) But why the crazy goldrush? Could it be, as one insider put it, FOMO (fear of missing Oculus)? Well, certainly that Facebook-owned business might be a strategic threat to Google's floor-wiping monopoly^H dominance. In IT Blogwatch, bloggers pay the lawnmower man. [You're fired -Ed.] Not to mention: Autism Is a Term for Behavior, Not Disease…

Guest blog post by Manish Bhoge I am Back ! Yes, I am back (on the track) on my learning track. Sometime, it is really necessary to take a break and introspect why do we learn, before learning. Ah ! it was 9 months safe refuge to learn how Big Data & Analytics can contribute to Data Product. Data strategy has always been expected to be revenue generation. As Big data and Hadoop entering into the enterprise data strategy it is also expected from big data infrastructure to be revenue addition.

CES 2016 was massive — 2.47 million net square feet of exhibit space, 3,800 exhibitors, and 170,000 industry professionals from 150 countries — it indeed was the most sought-after conference to attend to check out the latest technological products and innovations. Consumer Electronics Show, as the name suggests, has traditionally been the show about consumer electronics and gadgets. But this year it certainly was much more than that. CES 2016 was all about Big Data, IoT, and Cloud Connectivity. The overall theme was of convergence of gadgets, sensors, and networks into the IoT, about collecting data, and analyzing data.

Things have changed for data scientists over three years ago – and pretty much for the better. Take a look at Platfora's infographic comparing then with now.

Cisco unfurls a new service that analyzes log data to determine exactly what cloud services are being consumed by whom inside any organization.

Outokumpu, a global leader in the production of high-performance stainless steel, recently discovered something interesting when it started treating machines as individuals. From reactive to proactive maintenance planning, Outokumpu's philosophical shift underpins its new process with a focus on continuous measurement and improvement for achieving the best in quality, efficiency, availability and safety.

Outokumpu, a global leader in the production of high-performance stainless steel, recently discovered something interesting when it started treating machines as individuals. From reactive to proactive maintenance planning, Outokumpu's philosophical shift underpins its new process with a focus on continuous measurement and improvement for achieving the best in quality, efficiency, availability and safety.

A new survey of more than 300 C-level executives, conducted by BMC and Forbes Insights, revealed that known vulnerabilities are the leading cause of exposure to data breaches rather than new or emerging threats. Why are known vulnerabilities still a threat? Surprisingly, the threats and breeches continue due to internal frictions over what should be done and in what order.

There is no doubt that the big data industry is scrambling to bridge the skills shortage so the work can go on. You see many vendors churning out user-friendly tools for the uninitiated today. The latest addition to Booz Allen's lineup of such tools is the newly released Sailfish.

According to a new IDTechEx Research report, the robotics market is set to grow to over $120 billion within 10 years. Statically mounted robots will continue to be in use but it is mobile robots that will take the market by storm. The mobile robots will be more heavily suited with sensors than their static counterparts, will be data-driven with real-time analytics onboard, and many will be reconfigured from single- to multi-purpose.

Microsoft acquired Revolution Analytics and its distribution of open source R statistical modeling language almost a year ago. Today the company showed that R continues to be a cornerstone of its advanced analytics strategy. Here are details on the updates.

A recent query using Google Trends shows an interesting level of interest in machine learning over time (see figure below). There was an emergence in hype around the 2005 time-frame and led to a cooling off period, but once big data started heating up around 2010, the upward swing in interest continues until today.

In anticipation of their upcoming Predictive Analytics World for Workforce conference co-presentation, Predictive Analytics Unlocks Sustainable Cost Reduction In Hourly Workforce, we interviewed Lisa Disselkamp, Director at Deloitte, and Tristan Aubert, Senior Consultant — Advanced Analytics & Modeling at Deloitte. View the Q-and-A below to see how Lisa and Tristan have incorporated predictive analytics into the workforce of… The post Wise Practitioner – Predictive Workforce Analytics Interview Series: Lisa Disselkamp and Tristan Aubert at Deloitte appeared first on Predictive Analytics Times.

The founder and CIO of Global Risk Technologies talks about what factors went in to making her company a success.

Technology continues to change our lives in many ways. Consider the world of sports. Gone are the days when couch-bound sports fans or fans in attendance at arenas and stadiums took in games with their eyes only. Key advances in mobile and social computing provide great opportunities to engage fans interactively, get them in on the action in real-time and even market products to them in new ways.

Today we proudly announced that Arkena, one of Europe's leading media services companies, is using Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP™) to provide its media customers with an advanced analytics platform to deliver content to OTT customers through its content delivery network (CDN). This is a guest post from Reda Benzair the Vice President of Technical Development at Arkena. You can also join Arkena and Hortonworks February 16th for a live and on-demand webinar about their Advanced Analytics Platform click here.

by Richard Hackathorn The term "cloud" is often misunderstood, even by IT professionals. Simply put, the cloud treats computer resources as a service rather than as a product that is purchased. The cloud service model is similar to an electric or cable utility supplying its service over a grid. Users pay per service unit every month, without ownership and responsibility for running the utility.

Hiring data scientists can be one of the hardest job these days. One might think that it is hard because of lack of available candidates. I'd say it is just the opposite. Data science is so hot that many people rebrand themselves as data scientists. One of the issue when hiring is to discover among the many candidates which ones are true data scientists, and which ones pretend to be data scientists.




A recent survey delves into the IT positions that CIOs say are in demand for the first half of the year, and finds the major cities that are most likely to win with these expansion plans.

OK, I admit it, I over indulged during the Christmas break, but I would bet good money that I'm not the only one… 'Tis the season to be jolly (read as fat) after all. In order to combat my expanding waistline, I strapped on my fitness tracker and went for a run. 4 miles, 32 minutes, and 548 calories later, I am not sure if I feel better or worse. This is the least of my worries as I must first sync my tracker and post on social media immediately, and check for comments and likes every 30 seconds. Now I feel better, knowing that my networks and inner self have documented evidence of my inability to run further than 4 miles.

Google means business in virtual reality: That's the overwhelming message out of a VP shuffle that put Clay Bavor in charge only of VR. His other apps got given to Diane Greene. (Yes, Clay is now VP of VR. Sometimes this stuff simply writes itself.) But why? the crazy goldrush? Could it be, as one hilarious quote puts it, FOMO (fear of missing Oculus)? Well, certainly this Facebook-owned business could be a strategic threat to Google's huge monopoly^H dominance. In IT Blogwatch, bloggers pay the lawnmower man. [You're fired -Ed.] Not to mention: Autism Is a Term for Behavior, Not Disease…

Microsoft is giving developers and students a free crack at its new server software for the R programming language. [ Want to learn R? Download our free Basic Guide to R ] In a post to the company's Machine Learning blog, Microsoft Corporate Vice President Joseph Sirosh announced the new Microsoft R Server for Developers, which offers a free version of the software to members of the company's developer program. The software will give developers a test bed to work with an enterprise-grade version of the popular data analysis language before rolling it out into production.

The Web is big. Really, really big. While Wikipedia may be the go-to place for high school students wanting to do some lazy research, for commercial organizations data of note exists across every nook and cranny of the Web. But accessing that data, or, at least, consuming it in a readily digestible way, has generally been too hard. For the most part, websites that are designed for the easiest possible consumption by humans don't lend themselves to digital consumption and analytics. This is where import.io comes in. I first came across the company three or four years ago and was impressed by its vision.

2016 promises to be fruitful for the IT world. Let's see what companies promise their IT departments this year.

Sure, you've heard about NoSQL, but is it just another technology fad that's all hype? What can you actually do with a NoSQL database? With the performance and scalability that NoSQL offers, especially MapR-DB, the only limit is your imagination.

By visually accessible, I mean that you don't see the title, but instead, the top picture contained in each tweeted article, as illustrated below. It allows you to easily find out if you already read the article in question, or if it is worth reading. Also, I'm not sure exactly what the total is, it is certainly well above 500, probably in the thousands if not above 10,000 articles, as you can scroll down indefinitely when visiting these Twitter pages.

This entry was posted in News and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.